Complex Emergencies and Education

Global Education Cluster Pakistan. (2014). Education Bulletin, 46.

The Education Cluster in Pakistan is co-led by Save the Children and UNICEF and has been responding to various emergency responses such as conflict and floods. The Education Cluster Strategic Response Plan (SRP) 2014 has been developed and submitted to OCHA. The Education Cluster aims to reach 148,895 displaced and returnee children including 77,426 girls (52%) in KP and FATA. The intervention will ensure maximum enrolment of girls and boys’ students in the schools through strategies like support schools in IDP camp in KP and FATA, by providing additional resources and support in terms of para-teachers, teaching learning and recreation material, and school tents in primary and secondary schools in the affected host communities. It will also provide capacity building to government and para-teachers, and reopen damaged schools through establishment of Temporary Learning Centers (TLCs). Moreover, it will also carry out a detailed assessment to evaluate the demand and supply side needs.

https://pak.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Pakistan%20Education%20Cluster%20Bulletin%2346.pub%20v2.pub__0.pdf

An Analysis of the Impact of the Floods On MDGs in Pakistan.(2011). United Nations.

The primary aim of this report lies in highlighting the implications of disasters for achievement of the MDGs, assessing the recovery needs, formulating appropriate and feasible strategies to bring Pakistan back on to a positive development trajectory. While the report looks at all MDGs, for the purpose of the analysis of impact of floods on the education sector, MDG 2 and 3 are particularly useful. The report shows that Pakistan’s Net Enrolment Rate (NER) as a result of the floods shows a drop, due to schools being destroyed or used as public shelters. In terms of gender disparity, geographic displacement has increased the vulnerability of girls and constrained their mobility. There are also challenges on the supply side including:  difficulties in establishing ‘culturally sensitive’ learning spaces to encourage female enrollments and ensuring return of female teaching staff. Thus, key interventions should include back to school programs as well as budgetary support for supplementing government education budget. However, it must be taken into account that while there is a lot of information through surveys, rapid assessments, and preliminary assessments, “standardized” information is not available consistently across sectors or geographical regions.

www.worldwewant2015.org/file/311136/download/338159